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The Gospel of Diabetes: a New 3D Bio-print wound dressing



   A team of researchers in Argentina recently designed a series of customizable wound dressings using 3D printing technology, greatly improving the healing process and preventing the spread of dangerous infections. 

   People with diabetes are particularly vulnerable to bacterial infections caused by skin wounds. A team of researchers in Argentina recently designed a series of customizable wound dressings using 3D printing technology, greatly improving the healing process and preventing the spread of dangerous infections. The groundbreaking new project was carried out by a team from the National Council for Scientific and technological Research (CONICET) of Argentina and the (CINDEFI) Nano-Biomaterials Laboratory of the Centre for Industrial fermentation Research and Development. They have previously studied several innovative 3D biprint systems, including a dual-syringe 3D printer that can combine polymers in a unique way.

   

  Starting with leg and foot trauma, the team used 3D scans to scan affected skin areas, and then 3D printed wound dressing designs to perfectly fit patients' skin and optimize their burning power. A dressing will be added to fight bacterial infections that may grow around necrotic tissue. According to senior researcher Guillermo Castro (Guillermo R. Castro), custom printed dressings can present their features, customizing treatments, antibiotics and doses, depending on the shape and depth of the injury. Remember that many people have adverse reactions to certain drugs.

  

  A special biological-based gel material is used in the 3 D biometric printing process. The macromolecular biopolymer promotes the growth of cells needed to repair skin wounds and is easily modeled as the shapes and patterns needed to fit the wounds and effectively manage antibiotics. In order to develop this method, a new printing system was designed from scratch. The total printing time for each wound dressing should not exceed half an hour. If the technique proves this, it could soon be applied to a wider range of wounds in different parts of the body. Not only that, but also can be used to treat burn-induced lesions. This article is reproduced from other websites.